Lenz is proud to be the Presenting Sponsor of the 7th annual PT Solutions Allatoona Triathlon. The race takes place on June 25 at the Dallas Landing Park on Lake Allatoona in Acworth, Georgia and will be raising money to support the Rally Foundation for Childhood Cancer Research.

PT Solutions Physical Therapy is a great organization and a fantastic client,” said Lenz CEO Richard Lenz. “We are honored to have the opportunity to support this wonderful event and the important cause of childhood cancer research.”

In addition to the event sponsorship, the Lenz team is providing social media, public relations, and advertising services for this event.

Interested in participating? The PT Solutions Allatoona Triathlon caters to both beginners and experts. The sprint triathlon consists of an inviting 500m swim at Dallas Landing, a beautiful 16-mile bike course, and a 5K run leading into Historic Downtown Acworth, GA. Join the fun and support the important work of the Rally Foundation for Childhood Cancer Research by registering on or before June 18!

Before you go, get in the racing spirit by checking out the Allatoona Triathlon promotional video created by the Lenz team:

How do you take often uncomfortable topics and develop messages that connect with potential patients looking for first-rate care? What do patients really want from their healthcare experience? These are just a couple of the questions the Lenz team asked when developing Georgia Urology’s 2017 “Confidence” campaign.

The “Confidence” campaign is designed to articulate the wide array of benefits that patients receive by partnering with Georgia Urology for their healthcare. And it recognizes that urology comes with particular sensitivities and considerations.

“The service offerings provided by Georgia Urology are critical, sometimes even life-saving,” said Accounts Supervisor Christine Mahin, who leads the Georgia Urology account for Lenz. “But we also knew they involved medical issues many people feel embarrassed and ashamed to discuss or seek help for. So, we asked ourselves: What does Georgia Urology offer patients that other practices do not?”

Following extensive research and after receiving important insights from the leadership at Georgia Urology, the Lenz team established a campaign theme that embodies Georgia Urology’s value to patients: confidence.

The concept was first articulated in a 60-second radio ad written by Lenz VP of Marketing, Mike Killeen:

Confidence.

It seems to be the missing ingredient in healthcare today.

We know more about the human body than ever before, benefit from cutting-edge research, and have access to medical technology that previous generations would have never dreamed of.

Yet, when it comes time to decide what to do for you and your family’s health, the choices can be overwhelming.

With something so important, you deserve a partner that you believe in. That’s called confidence. And it’s exactly what you get with Georgia Urology.

The concept of confidence speaks to how Georgia Urology’s patients feel when interacting with their care team, and when living their everyday lives. They are confident that they have chosen the right practice to care for them, that they are receiving the best, most appropriate treatments for their condition, and that they can confide in their care provider.

Similarly, Georgia Urology helps its patients live life freely and confidently, without worrying about the potential social impacts of their urological condition.

Lenz Creative Director Ben Barnes described the nuances behind developing visuals to fit this creative concept. “While every ad may not say ‘confidence’ directly, it’s the whole idea behind it that really counts. The idea we wanted to convey is that you can talk to your urologist without fear at Georgia Urology.”

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 The Lenz design team relied heavily on both overt and subtle design elements to effectively bring the “Confidence” concept to life in a visual way.

The black-and-white imagery helped address the often serious, sensitive nature of the conditions Georgia Urology treats. Images were intentionally cropped to omit the faces of the primary subjects, making it easier for consumers to insert themselves into the scenarios displayed. Everyday situations were often conveyed in the artwork to make the messaging relatable. The green arrow framing the primary text intentionally elicits a shield, bringing associations of protection and guardianship to Georgia Urology’s name.

Finally, the Lenz Interactive team worked hand-in-hand with the design team to update the Georgia Urology website so that it harmonized with the campaign aesthetic. Lenz wanted to make sure the campaign was fully integrated: from billboards to the website. We strove visually to assure those who searched for the Georgia Urology brand online knew they were at the right place when they reached the homepage.

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The Georgia Urology “Confidence” campaign is being extended throughout print, broadcast, and digital mediums in the Metro Atlanta market. The Lenz team is excited to continue to assist in developing Georgia Urology’s brand and promoting the confidence they provide their patients every day.

At Lenz, we love working with our clients to develop strategic and creative concepts to help them meet their goals. To learn more about our process, our team, and how we can help your business, click here.

Lenz Marketing recently planned and executed an Atlanta-wide billboard campaign for Resurgens Orthopaedics consisting of six billboards strategically placed in and around the perimeter. The year-long campaign included rotating seasonal artwork displaying aspirational copy lines and images that speak to the practice’s Reach for More campaign. The boards can be found throughout the city including on I-85, I-75S, I-75N, I-285E, and on the Turner Field connector.

VP of Marketing Mike Killeen recently spoke to a healthcare marketing class at Valdosta State University. Here are the notes from Mike’s presentation.

1. Marketing healthcare is noble work

It connects doctors and patients who need them

Marketing often gets a bad rap. For some, it is the dark side of business, purely focused on making the cash register ring. But the purpose of marketing is to connect people with products and services they desire.

In turn, healthcare marketing exists to connect patients with healthcare providers and services that can help them stay healthy, get well, and live better lives.

Sure, marketing has been used to sell cigarettes to children. That’s bad. But more often it helps patients in need find a doctor that can care for them. That’s good.

 

2. Patients are people, too

They drink Coke and vote in elections

Effective healthcare marketing has more in common with consumer product marketing than most people realize. Why? Because patients are people, not some foreign species that exists only to receive medical treatment.

In other words, we’re all consumers, making choices everyday about what soda to drink, which political candidate to vote for, and where to take our sick kids for care.

Consumers arrive at buying decisions for different products in similar ways. They want value. They want to make choices with confidence. And, most of all, they want to associate with brands, organizations, and products that reinforce their views of themselves.

That’s true whether they are choosing a doctor or a can of sugar water.

 

3. Healthcare is jazz

Overnight shipping is the symphony

Patients may not be a foreign species, but doctors and healthcare executives often are!

That’s a joke of course, but the point is that the most singular aspect of healthcare marketing isn’t the patient audience, but working within the healthcare ecosystem, which presents a set of dynamics very different from other industries.

The healthcare industry is a constellation of loosely associated components striving to move together in a positive direction – kind of like a jazz band. Hospitals, physician practices, government, private insurance groups, pharmaceutical companies, and non-profit organizations all play a role. Sometimes they are well coordinated, and sometimes they are not. Overnight shipping, on the other hand, is more like the symphony: a well “orchestrated” set of activities arranged with a single goal in mind.

Today, the healthcare industry is experiencing a rapid transformation toward consumerism, where patients make independent choices about their care team instead of relying entirely on physician referrals. Most senior physicians and leadership entered the industry and built successful practices before the rise of the Internet and healthcare reform helped create this new reality.

So, understanding how patients make decisions is the easier part. Understanding how to effectively communicate the value of direct-to-patient marketing to a healthcare organization’s leadership requires a deeper understanding of the industry.

 

4. Nobody cares until they do

Then it’s all that matters

There is a segment of the population that is always in the market for a new guitar. If they had the money, the space, and their spouse’s approval, they would buy a guitar every day. But on a given day, relatively few people have an interest in or need for an orthopedic surgeon. Their backs, knees, and shoulders feel great. So, they probably wouldn’t even notice a TV commercial for an orthopedic group. But an ad about a holiday special at Guitar Center? That gets their hearts pounding every time.

There’s an old healthcare marketing joke about the guy who injures his knee and turns on the radio, waiting to hear the first ad for an orthopedic surgeon, so he knows where to go for help. The point is that that’s not how it works. By the time you injure your knee, the well marketed practice has probably already won your business, even if you didn’t consciously notice their TV ads until you were hurt.

Healthcare is a service that most people don’t think or care about until they need it. Once they do, it’s all that matters to them, and then they want to act fast. The lesson is that healthcare marketing requires branding—establishing a preference in the mind of the consumer before they have a need—and patience until the need arises. It’s an investment, but one that pays off.

 

5. All doctors are experts

And everybody cares

If you are a physician in America, there is some good news and some bad news. The good news is that the public recognizes you as an expert. The bad news is that they think the same of your colleagues and competition.

The message is that clinical expertise is rarely a differentiator. Word of mouth based on bedside manner and even wait times are more likely to separate a physician from the pack—as is an association with well-esteemed and well-branded institution.

Marketing works best when there is an appropriate balance between functional and emotional appeals. But the classic healthcare marketing mistake is saying, “we are experts” (functional appeal) and “we care” (emotional appeal).

Expertise and compassionate medicine are examples of the “price of entry” concept—where what is most important to the consumer is also expected by them, and therefore does not differentiate one product from another. A healthcare provider promoting expertise and compassion will be about as effective as a restaurant promoting its clean kitchen, or an airline promoting safety. In either case a stronger position, or differentiator, is required for success.

 

6. Big data is coming

But will patients accept it?

In some ways healthcare marketing is the ultimate branding platform. Historically, very little data has been published about patient outcomes, and treatment expenses are largely hidden from view.

So, what do patients compare? Their perceptions and the reputations of the healthcare providers they consider. In other words: their brands.

This may be changing. Soon, we will see more healthcare data than ever before. Healthcare reform and the advent of Accountable Care Organizations are tying payment models to patient outcomes. Medicare has begun releasing physician-payment records annually, providing public access to how billions of dollars are spent on healthcare each year. And high deductible insurance plans are helping accelerate the retail medicine movement.
Together, these changes further contribute to an increasingly consumer healthcare environment where patients will have the opportunity to consider the more functional components (like treatment results and pricing) rather than relying on physician referrals and quality perceptions when making healthcare decisions.

The questions are whether, and how fast, patients will embrace the opportunity.

 

7. Dear Doctor: It’s not about you

Tell your patients’ stories, not yours

For whatever reason, doctors really like promoting their backgrounds: the schools they attended (all four of them), their certifications, prior hospital leadership positions, the conferences they attended, and the papers they’ve published.

But their audience—the ones who make or break their businesses—are patients who want to hear about the things that affect them: the treatments they have to choose from, what they’ll experience on their first office visit, and whether their insurance is accepted.

If they do care to hear about their doctor, it’s not where they went for residency, but why they entered medicine, what they are passionate about, and which former patient had the greatest impact on their life – all things that will help discerning patients understand what they can expect from their doctor.

pa_logo-gpccLenz is proud to support the eighth annual ProstAware Blue Ties Luncheon, benefitting ProstAware, a nonprofit devoted to raising awareness of prostate cancer.

The 2016 Blue Ties Luncheon will be held Friday, September 9 at the Ritz-Carlton Buckhead, and feature a keynote address from Vince and Barbara Dooley, the first family of Georgia Football, as well as a special appearance from Heisman Trophy winner George Rogers. 11-Alive newscaster Jeff Hullinger will emcee the event.

Tickets are $100 and available at Prostaware.org.

Lenz is a diamond level sponsor of this event, alongside Toyota, Northside Hospital, and Georgia Urology.

“ProstAware has done an incredible job of raising awareness for prostate cancer,” Lenz founder and CEO Richard Lenz said. “We are thrilled to support this year’s Blue Ties event, and all that ProstAware will accomplish in the future.”

Now in its eighth year, the annual Blue Ties event raised over $50,000 in 2015. These generous donations will contribute to ProstAware’s year-round educational programing and screening events.

Vince Dooley is best known for guiding the Georgia Bulldogs to the 1980 national title. He was twice named national coach of the year and seven times earned Southeastern Conference coach of the year honors. George Rogers was awarded the Heisman Trophy in 1980 while attending the University of South Carolina, and was a Super Bowl champion during his career in the National Football League.

Prostaware is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization that has sought to raise awareness of prostate cancer through music, technology and sports since its founding in 2008 by acclaimed prostate surgeon Dr. Scott D. Miller.

Cornerstone_Med_Ctr_Vert_ColorLenz recently helped the former Hutcheson Medical Center in Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia re-open as Cornerstone Medical Center. Lenz partnered with the hospital’s leadership, employees, and community to develop the new name, logo, and visual identity.

Cornerstone Medical Center CEO Jessica Long recently explained the inspiration for the hospital name. “The name comes from the Cornerstone Club, a group of community laborers who made weekly financial contributions from their individual paychecks to expand the Post Hospital and create the Medical Center we know today,” she said. “We feel the name honors the dedication of this community and exemplifies a fresh start and new beginning.”

Cornerstone Medical Center is owned by ApolloMD. The hospital provides emergency medicine, radiology, laboratory services, and a pharmacy.

Lenz recently designed, developed, and launched a new website for PT Solutions, one of the nation’s largest and leading physical therapy practices: PTSolutions.com.

With locations in 10 states, PT Solutions uses research-driven physical therapy treatments to provide patients relief and restoration of their normal lives.

The website’s primary goals are to educate visitors about the benefits of physical therapy, provide current patients the information they need to conveniently seek care, and to give prospective patients an opportunity to request an appointment.

 

Lenz recently designed, developed, and launched a new website for the Atlanta Center for Medical Research: ACMR.org.

ACMR has been a national leader in research studies since 1982, helping to ensure that the medicines that reach our drug stores and our medicine cabinets are safe and effective.

The website’s primary goals are to educate potential study participants about current trials, and to provide an opportunity to participate in a study.

 

Eric Riesenberg, the director of business operations for ACMR, a Lenz client, was featured in an Executive Profile of the Atlanta Business Chronicle in its Jan. 8-14 edition.

In the story, Riesenberg explains the business model of ACMR, one of the foremost medical research companies in the United States, and how it is a “win-win-win”:

“We do this as a business,” He said. “The drug companies get the data. The individual who comes in typically gets better care in a clinical trial.”

In addition, David Hartnett, senior vice president of economic development for the Metro Atlanta Chamber of Commerce, lauded Riesenberg’s decision to locate ACMR’s new facility in the former Southwest Atlanta Hospital.

“He felt that turning around a community was his first and foremost mission,” Hartnett said. “Then the business would come… He clearly gives back.”

Click here for the full story.

It’s been a big year for our friends at SouthCoast Health. Lenz has proudly partnered with the practice to launch its new brand, develop a new website, and film a TV commercial that’s currently airing throughout the Low Country.

 

We are also using print media to continue to define the notion of “Total Wellness.”

 

Each of the following ads showcases a unique aspect of “Total Wellness” for SouthCoast’s growing audience while giving patients a glimpse of the types of medical care they can expect from the practice.

 

Savannah Magazine, Spread

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Savannah Magazine, Full Page

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South Magazine, Full Page

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Ardsley Magazine, Full Page

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