Don’t Fall for Miracle Marketing Cures for Your Physician Practice

By Mike Killeen

Healthcare Marketing

We live in the era of the quick fix. The miracle cure. The hack.

Obsessed with our health — or at least with looking healthy — we try to transform our lives with fad diets, elaborate exercise contraptions, and exotic performance supplements. Infomercials, algorithmic ads, and YouTube stars all offer us health, happiness, and well-toned beauty in a colorful box for just three easy payments.

However, good doctors know that enduring health is not something you order online or complete in 30 days. And it’s not something for which you need an entrepreneurial inventor.

The same is true of marketing healthcare businesses. There are plenty of digital agencies and cloud-based disruptors who promise exponential business growth using nothing but the Silicon Valley solution that just happens to be their specialty or proprietary platform.

But enduring business growth, like health, is not something you achieve with a single, shiny, sexy solution.

—–

Good health is simple: eat well, exercise regularly, and get enough sleep. Don’t drink too much alcohol and don’t smoke.

Practice these good lifestyle choices over a lifetime, and better health will follow. Indeed, multiple studies have found that lifestyle choices account for more than half of our health and middle age morbidity.

Beyond the basics, modern medicine and advanced interventions can cure what a balanced diet cannot. But heal a patient who continues their poor lifestyle habits, and you can be sure they’ll be back soon with something else wrong.

Good marketing of your practice is simple, too. While digital gurus and self-appointed paradigm shifters can give you a quick hit of attention, those benefits won’t last unless they’re backed up by the basics.

If you want a healthier business with growth that endures, here are the simple but effective marketing habits you need to practice consistently over time.

1. Set clear marketing goals.

Should you advertise your practice on Facebook? Rent a billboard? Send postcards? Start a blog? Sponsor a community event? Redo your website? What about that online reputation management firm that sent you an email ad? Are they worth it?

The answer to each is another question: what’s the goal?

Always begin your marketing plan with a clear articulation of your goals. Make sure your goals are specific and measurable.

Do you want to grow your new patient referrals by 10 percent? Launch your new practice area? Bring in enough business over the first three years to cover the cost of the new imaging equipment you purchased? Merge with another practice and both come out ahead?

Once you know your goals, develop an overall strategy for achieving them. Finally, choose the most effective tactics to implement your strategy.

Follow this process, and it will become clear whether radio ads, pay-per-click banners, a video, sponsored social media, print advertising, email marketing, or all of the above will serve you best. Your strategies will tell you which tactics to choose. Your goals will determine your strategies.

Goals, strategy, tactics, execution: in that order, every time.

2. Know your audience.

Here’s the thing about marketing your practice: most of the people don’t matter, and you shouldn’t waste your time and money on marketing as though they do. Who are your potential patients or clients? These are the only people who matter, and you need to know them well.

With some interesting exceptions, most medicine remains a locally practiced profession, which means you only need to reach people within a reasonable radius of your practice. What is that radius? It probably depends on the nature of your practice. Will people drive 50 miles to get to you? 15 miles? Will they board a plane and fly to you? Or are you providing lab and analysis services that aren’t constrained by geography?

What is the age range of your potential patients? If you specialize in hip replacements, you probably don’t need to market to Millennials yet. If you’re a pediatrician, your primary audience is parents with children. Sports medicine? Your audience’s age range is broad, but you need to target people with active lifestyles. Or are your clients other doctors, and how old are they?

What else can you know about your potential patients or clients? What are their income and education levels? Their preferred means of seeking information and advice? Do they even use social media, and if so, which platforms? What are they looking for from their healthcare providers? What does a good life look like to them?

Ask yourself these questions and many more. Learn all you can about your audience. Write up a persona that describes them with as much detail as possible. Revise it regularly as you learn more, or as demographics change. (Many Millennials are now parents raising children. Generation Xers may start needing hip replacements in a decade or so).

Knowing your audience well brings a laser focus to your marketing decisions. It keeps you from getting distracted trying to reach all those people who don’t benefit from your services. Develop your strategy and choose your tactics based on what will reach your unique audience. If the rest of the world doesn’t care, doesn’t like it, or doesn’t notice… well, that just doesn’t matter.

3. Build and maintain your brand and position.

Who are you, and what do you uniquely offer to your potential patients or clients? And how will people learn this about you?

Branding and positioning are fundamental to all effective marketing. They arise out of your goals: what kind of practice do you want to be? And they should speak to your audience: who are the potential patients of the kind of practice you want to be? If you want to attract those patients, you must have and follow a plan that will establish in their minds your unique identity.

In the marketing world, we have understood this for a very long time—branding creates a preference before there is a need—but many healthcare providers still don’t brand and position themselves well or consistently. Yet no marketing plan can have sustainable success without a well-developed brand and a well-articulated position.

While true in all marketing, this is especially true for healthcare. In a heartbeat, your potential patients may go from complete disinterest in doctors to making a life-altering decision. Which practice will they choose? The one that has already branded and positioned itself most effectively in that practice area… long before the patient ever thought to pay attention or care.

Consider someone who has just received their first cancer diagnosis. Where will they go for cancer treatment? They have probably not paid much attention to information about cancer treatment specialists, but suddenly this is the most important information in the world. They wonder, “Where’s the best place to get treatment for my cancer?” And they probably have an instant answer in the very moment that they learn of the need. It’s the practice that has, long before this moment, most effectively marketed its brand and position as the leader in cancer care.

Whatever your practice area, you want to be the instant favorite when a potential patient first learns they need the care you provide. You do that through marketing your brand and position consistently.

A lot goes into this. You need a quality logo and a visual identity that you use consistently across all communications and in your physical space. You need a story to tell and an articulation of your unique value. You need to tell that story to your audience and show that value regularly. You need to demonstrate why you’re different and better than your competition.

Branding doesn’t come with the same fast feedback loop you may get with a pay-per-click campaign. But over time, just like exercise, healthy diet, and good sleep, the benefits are profound and lasting.

Bonus: Don’t forget about the product.

For all that marketing can do to help you grow your practice, the single most effective way to bring in new patients or clients is word-of-mouth marketing. Good reviews from happy patients and enthusiastic referrals from other healthcare professionals do more than any email marketing campaign ever could.

So, here’s the best thing you can do to build a healthy practice: keep doing what you’ve always done. Be the good doctor you have always been. Treat your patients as well as you always have. Give them good care. Cure them when you can. Help them manage what can’t be cured. Ease their suffering. Keep learning. Try to do a little better every day. Do what you entered this field to do and have done every day of your career: help people live healthier, happier lives.

The best marketing campaigns — in healthcare or anywhere else — have this in common: a genuinely inspiring story to tell. Keep making your life’s work an inspiration, and use these simple marketing principles to share that inspiration with your audience. A healthy practice is sure to follow.

Your Marketing Questions Answered

In our conversations with current and prospective clients, certain questions about marketing come up again and again, no matter their industry, company size, or business goals.

Five of these questions are:

  • How do we measure success?
  • How much should we spend on marketing?
  • Why should we outsource our marketing, instead of staffing up?
  • Do you have specific experience marketing in my industry?
  • Should I use traditional or digital marketing?

In hopes of helping our clients, and any business leaders with marketing questions, we decided to share the answers we often give.

How do you measure success?

When our clients ask us how we measure marketing success, we understand what they’re really asking: How will I know whether the investment I made in marketing has given me a good return?

In the age of digital marketing, we can analyze abundant data to track the reach and impact of your marketing campaign. Web traffic, search rankings, social engagement, click rates and open rates, impressions, content downloads, qualified leads, conversions, and more.

We use this data where we think it’s relevant. But marketing metrics are only meaningful when they’re connected to business metrics. Marketing success must lead to business success. And ultimately it’s our job to help your business succeed.

Of course, success is something we define anew in conversations with every client.

  1. What are your business goals?
  2. What marketing strategy can support those goals?
  3. What tactics are best suited for that strategy?

In the answers to these questions, together, we discover what success will look like for you.

Your business goals might be to:

  • Increase new patient referrals by 10%.
  • Increase sales revenue through your e-commerce portal by 20%.
  • Streamline your staffing needs by shifting more customers to your website.
  • Make your new location profitable by the end of the year.

With your business goals defined, we can create a marketing strategy to support your success. Then, we select the most effective marketing tactics to deliver on that strategy, tactics whose results we can measure.

  • How many new leads did a white paper or infographic generate in your sales funnel?
  • How many people signed up for and read your newsletter?
  • How many new people registered on your website?
  • How many people left reviews of your practice on reputation sites, and what was the increase in your average rating?

Sometimes the measure of success is more qualitative than quantitative. Reporters reach out to you as an expert in your field. Patients mention how moved they were by your latest inspiring video. A community comes to embrace your organization as part of their local culture.

Whatever the relevant metrics may be, the key is to connect the marketing results to your business results, which provide the true measure of your success. We’ll work with you to analyze that connection and evaluate how well the marketing strategy served your business goals.

Many factors will contribute to the overall success of your business goals, some of them within your control, some of them within ours, and some beyond control. We’ll discuss all of these with you as we work together to plan for and measure your success.

How much should we spend on marketing?

First of all, ignore anyone who gives you a single, simple number without any specific consideration of your business or your goals. There is no one-size-fits-all answer to this question. At least no answer worthy of your ambitions—your business deserves better than that.

Some inadequate answers you might hear include:

“Set your marketing budget based on standard practice in your industry.”

This approach doesn’t consider the unique opportunities, challenges, and goals of your business.

“Spend a certain percentage of your current revenue on marketing.”

Marketing should drive revenue, not the other way around.

“Allocate to marketing whatever’s left after you’ve covered staffing, rent, and other expenses.”

This ignores marketing’s role as a key revenue-generating activity of any business.

Instead, the budget you set should be based on your goals and the unique context of your business.

  1. What are your business goals?
  2. What marketing strategy will best serve your business goals?
  3. What marketing initiatives and tactics will successfully execute that strategy?
  4. What will utilizing all those tactics cost?

When you’ve answered all four, you’ll know what your marketing budget should be.

It’s not a simple formula and it doesn’t lend itself to back-of-the-envelope calculations, but it’s the only way to really plan for success. Anything less is just throwing money at marketing and hoping for the best.

But what do you do if you work the numbers and come up with a marketing budget that you just can’t afford?

Together, we can explore how to get the most out of what you can afford. And we can also revisit your goals. Perhaps you need to take on more modest goals for now, and return to your larger ambitions when your revenue has grown enough to support them. Or perhaps you keep your goals but use a phased approach, spreading out the timeline and your costs.

While you’d always rather do everything possible to achieve your greatest ambitions, good marketing is like good business. In the long run, your business is best served by a careful analysis of costs and benefits, and by an intentional and targeted approach to your spending.

In the final analysis, your marketing budget should always be specific to your organization’s needs and ambitions. No other company’s budget really matters. All that matters is what budget will support your success.

Why should we outsource our marketing? Why not staff up?

For very large companies, staffing up may be the right choice, although even most multinational companies augment their marketing staffs with outsourced agency expertise.

But for most organizations, there can be many benefits to outsourcing to an integrated marketing firm, like LENZ. These include:

  1. Expertise. We’ve been in business more than 25 years, and we have the collected experience and wisdom that comes with a team that has taken on many marketing challenges for a wide variety of clients. We have seasoned experts in brand strategy, advertising, digital marketing, design, content, media, public relations, and more. It’s a level and breadth of expertise that most companies can’t duplicate in-house without busting their budget.
  2. Integration. Marketing works best when all your efforts are well coordinated within a clear strategy toward well-defined goals. You can staff and manage an in-house marketing department, or you can hire and coordinate six different marketing vendors in various specialties. But the best results come from working with a single, strategic partner who can integrate the full range of traditional and digital marketing tactics.
  3. Savings. When you outsource your marketing needs, you save yourself all the overhead that comes with hiring an in-house team, and you have the flexibility to draw on specific areas of our expertise when you need them most. Marketing is all we do, so we’ve found and developed many efficiencies and cost savings that we pass along to you.
  4. Stability. We’ve built our business on long-term relationships, and some of our clients have been with us for more than 20 years. We can save you the time and expense of repeatedly replacing and training new marketing staff. Our executive partners direct your marketing strategy, and our staff members tend to stay with us for a long time. We maintain a shared knowledge of your business throughout our company. For as long as you need us, we’ll be there for you.

We enjoy collaborating with in-house marketing teams when such opportunities arise. But many of our clients find they can get better results and cost savings by fully outsourcing to us instead.

Do you have specific experience in marketing my industry, type of company, etc.?

Maybe.

It’s true that every industry has some unique marketing needs and requires some specific expertise. However, the vast majority of what anyone needs from a marketing company is the same across all fields.

We have particular expertise in healthcare marketing, especially with hospitals, health networks, and large physician practices. And we help many clients who work hard for the greater good, from public health advocates and higher education to community organizations and nonprofits.

But more fundamentally, our expertise is in areas that transcend the industries and organizational structures of our clients. We are curious and capable lifelong learners who love nothing better than to learn something new. We’re experts in finding and telling the compelling stories of our clients. We’re adept at connecting companies to their customers. We’re students of business, designers and content creators, PR and media specialists, branding and advertising experts, analysts and advisors.

These skills are what we offer. They’re valuable when applied to fields we already know well, and to fields we’re getting to know better. After all, even if we have decades of experience in your industry, your organization is unique. To market it well, we’ll have to learn a lot about you, your goals, and your competition—and create a custom strategy that is unlike any other. That’s what we do best.

Should I use traditional or digital marketing?

Yes.

Or, for the unabridged, five-word answer: It depends, but probably both.

Traditional and digital marketing tactics each have their own strengths.

For an emotional appeal delivered to a mass audience, nothing can beat the reach and impact of a well-produced television or radio ad. A billboard or a local newspaper ad establishes your business as part of the neighborhood in ways that website banners rarely can. And well-designed printed flyers or direct mail can resonate for people in ways that ephemeral social media posts less often do.

Digital advertising can be more precisely targeted and measurable. Email marketing is generally less expensive than its paper-based counterpart. Compelling video and social media content can spread organically far beyond your initial reach. And sponsored content marketing can help establish you as a thought leader in your field.

Strategically combined, the strengths of traditional and digital marketing complement one another for the most effective results.

Even within the world of digital marketing, customers often arrive because of something they’ve seen on traditional media. A TV ad might prompt a Google search, and that search in turn will influence future Google Ads results. Presented with the first page of search results or an online ad, customers are more likely to click on a familiar brand, maybe the brand they’ve seen on billboards or heard on the radio.[1]

Because digital marketing is easier to track and measure than traditional marketing, it can appear that the digital spend is getting all the results. It may be tempting then to put all your money into digital. But in most cases, digital and traditional marketing are symbiotic, each helping the other succeed.

As with any other marketing decisions, the balance is found by returning to the goals and the strategy. What are you trying to accomplish? Who is your audience and where can you best reach them? What can your marketing budget support?

Choose the right set of tactics for the job at hand. In most cases, these will include both traditional and digital marketing, all orchestrated and integrated to best serve your overall strategy.

Do you have a question not answered above? Or would you like to further explore working with LENZ for your marketing needs? Contact us to begin the conversation.


[1] “How Likely are Consumers to Click on Personalized Ads?,” Dr. Liva LaMontagne, Marketing Sherpa, May 17, 2016. Retrieved September 26, 2018 from https://www.marketingsherpa.com/article/chart/how-likely-consumers-personalized-ads

DeKalb Surgical Associates, P.C. came to Lenz looking for a new logo and site design that would stay on-brand, but elevated; they wanted a site that was user-friendly and aesthetically pleasing for patients and a new logo that was more reflective of the group’s services.

With those goals in mind, see below for Lenz’s new site design for DeKalb Surgical along with what the site looked like before. Also pictured is the new logo compared to the old one.

New site design:

Old site design:

New logo:

Old logo:

Interested in learning more about how Lenz could help elevate your brand and business? Contact us here or give us a call today at 404-373-2021.

How Creativity Beats Brute Force in Marketing

By Mike Killeen

If you’re old enough to have witnessed the introduction of the first Macintosh computer, you probably remember the electrifying ad[1] that announced its release.

It was 1984, the year of Big Brother, and the thought police might be compelling conformity with IBM computers: dulling our imagination, assimilating us all into automata. And it was Super Bowl XVIII: Raiders versus Redskins, at time out and commercial break during the third-quarter.

An athletic woman in bright red shorts and a white tank top, carrying a sledgehammer, runs between rows of seated compliants who are staring up at a giant screen where a man speaks of information purification. She spins three times and hurls the hammer. The screen explodes. A voiceover announces that, in two days, Apple will release the Macintosh. He promises that 1984 will not be like 1984.

The ad, which was directed by Ridley Scott, was all over the news the next day, and Apple had, to say the least, a very successful product launch. The Super Bowl spot was the one and only airing of the commercial to a national audience. One was all it needed.

Counting the Quickening of Our Hearts

There’s an old adage that says it takes seven impressions for people to remember a marketing message and consider taking action. Or maybe it’s eleven impressions. Or three. Or, as claimed in 1885 by Thomas Smith in Successful Advertising[2], twenty. The number changes depending on who’s asserting it, usually without any evidence or citation. Attempts to study the matter with scientific rigor give more complicated and disputed results for a quantity that has been formalized as “effective frequency.”[3][4]

But whatever the number, the underlying idea is the same. Our brains are PCs running rigid procedural languages. If we enter the data, call the subroutine, and complete the required loops, then the action we want will be triggered. Over the decades, many billions of advertising dollars have been budgeted based upon this belief.

Perhaps that entire paradigm needs a sledgehammer through its screen. Memory, impressions, motivation to action: surely these arise from more than math. In the real world, we remember best that which resonates with our heart and understanding.

That time in third grade when Kristi S. looked at me in a way no girl had looked at me before. The first time I saw and heard Nirvana’s “Lithium” on MTV. The birth of my three children.

No repetition is needed for the moments that truly move us or the memories that can change us forever.

The Spark Not Carried by Semiconductors

We’re losing something important in this era of algorithms and analytics, of impressions, click-throughs, and conversions. We’re losing sight of the importance of creativity, the significance of talent, and the value of art. What is the worth of a great designer? A great writer? A talented actor? How many banner ad impressions can one gifted photographer replace?

College courses, museums, centers for performing arts: these still elevate in our culture the importance of creativity, talent, and art. But in business, we’re slipping under the sway of synthesized sirens who sing of machine learning-driven search marketing[5] and AI-managed email campaigns[6].

This is not to take away from the machines’ miracles. What digital data can do today is truly remarkable. We know so much more about our audiences. We can customize our messages and target delivery with a precision unimaginable even a decade ago. We can follow audiences wherever they may go, placing optimized impressions on every screen they may encounter.

Bending the Curve

So why do we bother to look for the creative spark, the light that resonates with a human heart? Why do we value human creators who know the mysteries of shaping fire into art?

Across the human experience, there are many reasons. But in the realm of marketing, we do the hard work of creating because it helps us bend the curve of needed impressions.

Multiple studies reported on in the Harvard Business Review found that ad campaigns with originality and high artistic merit delivered double the impact on sales.[7] They calculated that advertisers in most categories of industry could redirect a significant portion of their budget to develop more creative campaigns, spend less on buying impressions, and come out ahead on sales.

If we’re marketing a hospital birth center, we can serve up thousands of impressions that ours is “the best birth center.” And perhaps, with sufficient saturation, we’ll sway some people to suspect it is so. Or we can tell a moving story: a sacred passage, a new life entered in distress and then saved, two become three become one.

When a message is truly compelling, when it grips the imagination and quickens the heart, when it opens the poetic places within us… then we get more for so much less. We don’t have to run the ad as many times. We don’t have to follow our audience across all their screens. They may even come to us, asking us, please, tell me that story again.

This is the value of creativity, of talent, of unique physiques and voices, of ineffable humanity. When we create a message that moves people, the math matters less and the meaning matters more.

There’s an old adage that says you never get a second chance to make a first impression. But if that first impression inspires enough hearts to sing, one may be all you ever need.


[1] Apple (1984). 1984. Viewed March 5, 2018 at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VtvjbmoDx-I

[2] As reprinted in Kimmel, A.J. (2018). Psychological Foundations of Marketing: The Keys to Consumer Behavior. Routledge.

[3] Naples, Michael J. (1979). Effective Frequency: The Relationship Between Frequency and Advertising Effectiveness. Association of National Advertisers.

[4] Jones, John Philip (1997). “What does effective frequency mean in 1997?” Journal of Advertising Research, July-Aug. 1997, p. 14+. Academic OneFile, Accessed 30 Mar. 2018.

[5] Acquisio (2017, September). Acquisio Turing™ Machine Learning Performance Report. Retrieved March 30, 2018 from http://www.acquisio.com/sites/default/files/acquisio-turing-ml-performance-report.pdf

[6] Rathi, Nandini (2017, April 19). “4 ways AI can improve email marketing,” VentureBeat. Retrieved March 30, 2018 from https://venturebeat.com/2017/04/19/4-ways-ai-can-improve-email-marketing/

[7] Reinartz, Werner, and Peter Saffert. “Creativity in Advertising: When It Works and When It Doesn’t.” Harvard Business Review, Harvard Business Review, 31 July 2014, hbr.org/2013/06/creativity-in-advertising-when-it-works-and-when-it-doesnt.

One of the most powerful tools for marketing healthcare is patient success stories. When potential patients see personal stories from healthcare providers they are considering, a number of objectives are accomplished. The first and most important, however, is that they create an emotional connection with the audience.

Successful marketing often relies on two appeals: emotional and functional. To explain this further, we’ll look at how patient success pieces are the perfect example of this.

By using the emotional appeal of other patients who successfully received treatment, patient success stories humanize the practice and the physicians. This allows potential customers to think “I see myself in this patient,” which not only makes the doctor more marketable but also creates a community with the audience of the blog. Each patient will see this physician featured in the story as valuable because the emotion of a successful treatment for another patient will translate onto the page.

Emotion is essential, especially in healthcare. Emotion also makes the complicated world of healthcare more understandable. Doctors and physicians may know the technical terms for treatments and diseases, but patients mostly know the experience of going through medical emergencies and pain. A patient success story relates to the latter in a way that medical jargon simply cannot.

Here are several other objectives that patient success stories accomplish:

  • The medical facility and all of its staff are presented as capable. Any considering patient wants to make sure they’ll go to a skilled and professional physician.
  • Personal stories show the intimate side of the medical staff. By having access to these real-life stories, prospective patients are led to make better judgments about the doctors they want to work with before they even step into the office. A patient success story that shows the doctor as kind, caring, and life-saving will always attract new patients.
  • Patients trust other patients. If someone is looking for a doctor who specializes in knee care, success stories from other patients will only draw the person to the practice or doctor even more.

SouthCoast Health, a multi-specialty practice based in Savannah with 18 treatment locations and more than 120 health care providers, truly understands the benefits of this endeavor.

Lenz has brought numerous SouthCoast Health patient success stories to life. Here are just a few of the most recent examples:

  • Dwan Smith, a woman who turned her health around after a heart scare thanks to the doctors at SouthCoast Health.
  • Judy Williams, a loyal patient who has spent 30 years with SouthCoast Health.
  • Jim McGaw, who tells his story of surviving a heart attack with the help of SouthCoast Health.

If you would like for Lenz to work with you and your healthcare company to generate more patient success stories, contact us here today or give us a ring at 404-373-2021.

Lenz recently developed an infographic illustrating SouthCoast Health’s comprehensive healthcare services and benefits. From pediatrics to geriatrics, from sore throats to surgery, from well visits to weekend urgent care and everything in between, SouthCoast Health supports its patients every step of the way.

See below for the infographic Lenz designed!

Interested in learning more about how Lenz could help elevate your brand and business? Contact us here or give us a call today at 404-373-2021.

For more powerful and effective healthcare marketing, doctors should tell their patients’ success stories. One fantastic method for doing this is through patient testimonial videos.

A common approach many doctors take in trying to promote themselves and their practice is to highlight their training and certifications. However, more than a physician’s credentials or accolades, prospective patients are interested in hearing the stories of people who’ve entrusted their care to a medical practice. When potential patients start researching which provider to turn to for their healthcare needs, a positive patient success story not only speaks to the quality of the health practice but also enables the researcher to associate positive emotions alongside the name of the practice. Potential patients can relate to other patients more than they can a doctor, so they better understand the benefit of seeking improved health when a fellow patient discusses it and walks them through their real-life experience.

One of the most powerful ways to tell patient stories is through testimonial videos. More than ever, videos resonate in a sea of social media and website content, creating a powerful package that helps garner more trust in the practice. Since social platforms such as Facebook auto-play videos directly uploaded to a consumer’s feed, Lenz usually sees an increase in social engagement and web traffic after promoting a patient testimonial video.

Here are a few patient testimonial videos Lenz produced to tell patients’ success stories!

PT Solutions Patient Triumph videos

Interested in working with Lenz to help market your healthcare practice or services? Contact us here today or give us a ring at 404-373-2021.

Lenz recently helped the 2018 Amplify Decatur Concert Series, raise $40,000 for its beneficiary, Decatur Cooperative Ministry (DCM), a Decatur-based, nonprofit organization that works to prevent and alleviate poverty and homelessness in Decatur and DeKalb County.

The April 13-15 concert series was presented and marketed by Lenz and produced in partnership with Eddie’s Attic, the Southeast’s premier music listening room.

Since the first Amplify event (formerly known as Poverty Is Real) in 2011, Amplify has raised more than $190,000 for DCM. Each year, Lenz has served as the presenting sponsor and marketing agency for the event. Amplify was founded by Lenz partner and Vice President of Marketing Mike Killeen, who remains an Amplify board member. Christine Mahin, Lenz Marketing’s Accounts Supervisor, who has helped produce the Amplify Decatur Music Festival since 2016, served as festival director for the second consecutive year. Lenz President and CEO Richard J. Lenz serves as the Chair of the Amplify Advisory Board. And the entire Lenz team contributed to the marketing and production of the event.

On April 14, thousands gathered on the Downtown Decatur Square for the Amplify Decatur Musical Festival, the centerpiece of the concert series. The festival featured performances by an all-star Americana line-up, including The Lone Bellow, The Jayhawks, Amanda Shires, and Parker Millsap. Atlanta-based folk duo Dwayne Shivers also performed.

Richard Lenz said the event “checks a lot of boxes” for him. “Lenz has supported many causes, organizations, and events in Decatur since 1992, and what we look for locally is something that adds to the culture of Decatur, has a philanthropic purpose, and allows our company to make an impact using our talent, energy, and resources. My goal of building a successful music festival in Decatur is being achieved, thanks to so many.”

Amplify Decatur also featured a three-night stand at historic Eddie’s Attic, with performances by Jared and Amber, The Weather Station, Sirens of South Austin, and Antigone Rising. On April 15, the concert series culminated with a Steve Earle vs. Townes Van Zandt tribute night featuring eight local and regional acts.

Platinum sponsors included: Leafmore Group, Four Roses Bourbon, Natalie Gregory Sold, The Pinewood, Iris and Bruce Feinberg, WABE 90.1, Decatur Package Store, and Savannah Distributing Company. Gold sponsors included: Georgia Urology, Hall Booth Smith, Oakhurst Realty Partners, Topo Chico, Cox Media Group, Midwood Entertainment, Essentia Water, and ATL PBS.

Lenz is extremely proud to have worked alongside the Amplify My Community team to make this event as successful as it was.

Scroll down to view some of the photos from this amazing event!

Lenz is proud of its dedication to supporting environmental causes. Take a look at our recent work for Chautauqua for the Georgia Coast, a conference designed to raise awareness for preserving one of our state’s greatest treasures.

Chautauqua invitation design:

Chautauqua program book design:

Interested in learning more about how Lenz could help elevate your brand and business? Contact us here or give us a call today at 404-373-2021.

To help market the Atlanta Center for Medical Research’s recent study on major depressive disorder, Lenz designed and secured a premium placement for an advertisement in the April 2018 issue of Creative Loafing.

Interested in working with Lenz for your design and branding needs? Contact us here today or give us a call at 404-373-2021.