Lenz is proud to present the DeKalb Library Foundation’s Tapas & Trivia, to take place on Thursday, September 28 at the DeKalb History Center. Join Lenz is supporting the DeKalb Library Foundation, whose mission is to provide support beyond public funding while presenting educational, cultural, and literary programs and services to DeKalb County citizens. All proceeds of the event will go towards these efforts.

Visit this page here to buy tickets to Tapas & Trivia presented by Lenz.

“Lenz is all about enriching the community that surrounds us,” said Lenz Founder, President, and CEO Richard Lenz. “We’re excited to support an event that helps improve the lives of the people living in DeKalb County, which Lenz calls home.”

Participants should expect to enjoy tapas while bidding on live and silent auction items. There will also be a local trivia company, Trivial Matters, running a literature and library-related game of trivia.

Lenz is proud to once again support ProstAware’s ninth annual Blue Ties Luncheon as a Diamond level sponsor. As in years past, Lenz is helping to promote the event through traditional and digital media services.

The Blue Ties luncheon on September 8th benefits ProstAware, a non-profit organization dedicated to bringing prostate cancer awareness and education to men and their loved ones. This year’s event will feature a keynote address given by legendary NFL coach Dan Reeves, and a special guest appearance by William King of iconic funk & soul band The Commodores. Last year’s Blue Ties Luncheon helped raise a record $125,000 for the cause.

Tune into “The Weekly Check-Up with Dr. Bruce Feinberg” on Sunday August 27 from 3-5 p.m. to listen to an entirely Blue Ties themed show, featuring guest appearances by the organization’s founder and president, Dr. Scott Miller, and executive director, Tim Smith.

Other sponsors of the event include Georgia Urology, Toyota, Northside Hospital Cancer Institute, the Chick-Fil-A Peach Bowl, UPS, and The Coca-Cola Company.

If you’re interested in attending this year’s luncheon, visit the ProstAware website for more information and to buy tickets!

Allison Miller created the following article during her 2017 summer internship at Lenz.

Only eight short weeks ago, I began an internship in the creative department at a small (but influential) marketing firm known as Lenz.

Like every summer, time went by too fast. Before I say goodbye for now, here are five of the most influential things I learned during my time as a LENZtern.

Community matters.

While I spent most of my internship working at a desk, there were times when I was able to explore the area around the office – and in turn, learn about the community that surrounds it.

The highlight of every day is walking through the One West Court Square building in the morning and being greeted by the security guard, Tony.

“Good morning, Allison! I hope you have a wonderful Monday / Tuesday / Wednesday / Thursday / Friday.” Though our conversations are short and similar each time, it is always a pleasure being greeted by such an optimistic member of the community.

“Thank You” goes a long way.

“Thank you” notes are common practice in the world of business. At Lenz, however, everyone goes beyond expectations by thanking anyone and everyone for things as small as fixing the lock on a door to things as big as getting treated for lunch.

Experiencing such great appreciation firsthand really showed me how much better it feels when someone thanks you for your effort. I have found that it effortlessly promotes a healthy, happy work environment.

Collaboration is the key to success.

The most inspiring work I have done this summer has been created through some form of working with my supervisors and the other intern, Laura. Whether it was creating graphics or generating content for a client, my best work was generated through collaboration.

Because we specialize in building brands, almost every project I did was shaped by previous work. While trying to stay on brand with graphics can be limiting, I was actually intrigued by the challenge of creating something unique within brand guidelines.

Lenz is more than just a business.

I was originally drawn to Lenz because of the effort put into creating a great experience for clients and community members. Richard founded Lenz on the basis of “rejecting the negative reputation of the marketing industry and using the same tools for positive change.”

As my experience progressed, I could see just how much that statement was truly applied to company work ethic. At Lenz, everyone pays attention to detail, thinks outside the box, and goes above and beyond what is asked to ensure that everyone who interacts with our team leaves feeling great.

An internship is more than just a job.

My internship was typical in that I worked a simple 9-5 shift Monday through Friday. However, I found that when the clock stopped, my experience did not.

During the first week, Richard sent Laura and me an article titled The Other Sixteen Hours of Your Internship. The article described how an internship is so much more than a job; an internship is an experience. What I chose to do with my hours outside the office mattered as much as official work.

From working at my desk – to building relationships with professionals in my field – to chasing squirrels on the roof, I can say that my experience at Lenz was like no other in the best way imaginable.

A work by Lenz Creative Director Ben Barnes recently received worldwide recognition, when it was hosted at a museum in Milan, Italy.

The poster, entitled “Sow,” is the first in a series of three posters. Ben created the poster back in the mid 2000s based on the World War II Victory Garden Posters, most notably borrowing their militarist feel with a strong call to action. When asked why he made the poster, Ben said, “I wanted to do some good with the skill set that I had.” Ben wanted to motivate people to help the environment, and the poster does so by encouraging everyone to plant a garden.

When Ben began creating the poster, a professor that inspired Ben pointed him in the direction of a contest. The contest, called Green Patriot Posters, was hosted by two professors at the Rhode Island School of Design through an idea they called the “Canary Project.” The professors, just like Ben, wanted to use design as a way to do good and help the environment. The contest called for posters that had an aspect of environmental activism, and Ben’s poster fit right in. A year after the contest, the Canary Project picked Ben’s poster to be a part of a book produced from other art entered in the competition, alongside artists Shepard Fairey and DJ Spooky. The book received recognition from multiple online sources, including wired.com.

From there, the success of the poster snowballed. A year later, Ben was asked if his poster could be included in a large format calendar which would be released in Germany. Of course, he said yes. Fast forward yet another year, and the poster was included in a nationwide design museum tour alongside several other graphic design works. The exhibition was called “GRAPHIC DESIGN: NOW IN PRODUCTION,” and its travel list would make any voyager jealous. From New York to Texas to Los Angeles, Ben’s poster traveled across the states.

But the poster’s journey wasn’t done. Ben’s work made it all the way to Milan, Italy at the Triennale di Milaon Musuem. The poster joined other photographs, publications, and graphic materials produced by artists, architects, and community gardeners from across the globe. The exhibition, called ‘Urban Orchard’ and a part of the events of the 21st Triennale International Exhibition, presented a series of subjects related to urban agriculture.

Ben says, “It was all overwhelming, shocking, and surprising! I wasn’t expecting anything to come out of it. I was just thinking that this is something I could do and maybe use for my portfolio to show potential employers where my head is at. It’s just nice to feel like I could do more.”

Ben also said that, to him, his design and work isn’t about the recognition or awards. It’s about doing what he loves.