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Lenz and WABE co-sponsor Classical Brunch at City Winery

Lenz is proud to be co-sponsoring a Classical Brunch at City Winery on Sunday, December 4th from noon to 3 PM.

Attendees of the brunch will be treated to a full classical show hosted by radio personality Lois Reitzes. In addition to hosting several WABE 90.1 programs, Lois produces and hosts WABE’s Atlanta Symphony Orchestra broadcasts.

The show will feature the musical talents of Indra Thomas and Okorie Johnson Trio. The American soprano Indra Thomas made her professional debut as soprano soloist in Verdi’s Requiem with the New York Choral Society in Carnegie Hall and has been acclaimed to be the next great Verdi soprano. Okorie Johnson is an Atlanta based cellist and composer who uses high quality amplification, looping technology, and sound processing to create songs that utilize both jazz and classical music.

Tickets are $20 and available here.

Along side Lenz, WABE 90.1 is also a sponsor of City Winery’s Classical Brunch.

“Lenz is excited to be a part of an event that emphasizes the beauty of classical music,” Lenz founder and CEO Richard Lenz said.

City Winery Atlanta hosts monthly specialty brunches.

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We be ‘Festin’!

By Richard J. Lenz

When you work in a particular field, it shapes your worldview. Many times, I catch myself examining culture, business, and interpersonal relationships as the inevitable products and outcomes of communications, which is the essence of marketing. Kind of like, “Communications is Everything, and Everything is Communications.”

My usual elevator speech, somewhat tongue-in-cheek, is this: We use the evil tools and methods of advertising, communications, and marketing persuasion to advance the causes, people, organizations, and corporations that we believe are making a positive difference in the world. Through Lenz, we are trying to make a difference.

Lenz has viewed “Events” as communications and marketing as well, and has used events to advance our clients’ businesses in many ways.

This weekend, starting Friday night, is the AJC Decatur Book Festival, which has turned into, ahem, a Bookzilla of a book festival. Lenz’s efforts on the Festival started in 2005, when Daren Wang walked into my office and asked if we would be interested in helping to launch the book festival that the South needed.

As an author, editor, designer, and publisher of books, I told him, This is your lucky day!, and we jumped in with both feet. The festival has grown by leaps and bounds, and today requires my entire staff’s effort to support the event in the PR, Digital, Design, Social Media, Advertising, and Promotions areas.

In Decatur, Lenz has also been proud to support, in a variety of ways, the Arts Festival, Wine Festival, and Beer Festival, led by the city and an army of local volunteers and art, wine, and beer aficionados.  Just a few months ago, we helped launch Decatur’s first music festival, Amplify Decatur, which raised funds for Decatur Cooperative Ministry. I believe these events have gone a long way in positively marketing Decatur, which was recently listed first as one of the “Coolest Suburbs in America” on Thrillist.

After the Book Festival tents come down, I know the event I am most looking forward to, and that is the Atlanta Science Festival. Lenz will be working with the festival to help this great idea reach even more people and make a greater impact. Our interest and work on scientific and natural topics goes back to Lenz’s very beginnings, helping to market the Tennessee Aquarium, The U.S. Space and Rocket Center, The Junior Ranger Program, Project Wet, The Schoolyard Habitat Program, and editing and publishing 19 books on America’s greatest natural areas.

If I don’t see you at the Book Festival, I hope I will at the Atlanta Science Festival March 15-25, 2017!

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Content is King in Healthcare, Too.

In the marketing industry, “content is king” is a popular cliché.

The phrase is widely associated with Bill Gates in a blog he wrote nearly 20 years ago. Today, his messages seem prophetic, among them: “Content is where I expect most of the real money will be made on the Internet…” (see Netflix) and “No company is too small to participate” (see the millions of small businesses with a WordPress blog).

“Content” is shorthand for the engaging parts of your web presence—the blogs, photos, and videos, for example—that intend to connect with audiences rather than convert, or sell. And while some think of content purely through the prism of search engine optimization, a proper content strategy holistically considers the entirety of the user experience (another cliché) from the search query through the on-site conversion. In other words, getting people to your site is the first step, but they also need to find what they’re looking for, have a fulfilling visit, and eventually buy something from you.

This brings me to Lenz. When I joined the company way back in 2002, I was fresh out of UGA’s journalism school with visions of Woodward and Bernstein dancing in my head. Lenz hired me to write news and feature articles that would appear strictly on our clients’ web sites. When my friends would ask about my new job, I would say, “I write web releases, they’re kind of like press releases, but not important enough to send to the press.” Today I and the rest of the marketing world understand the value of blogging, while Lenz understood it from the beginning.

Ask a Lenzer how we market healthcare and she’ll tell you, “just like we market everything else.” Patients are people, we like to say. Lenz recognizes that healthcare is a unique industry and healthcare marketing, a specialized field. However, this does not mean you push the best marketing practices aside every time you work in a new industry. For patients, choosing a doctor—like choosing a soda, brand of sneakers, or presidential candidate—is a buying decision, and many commonalities apply.

According to the Pew Research Center, 72 percent of Internet users looked online for health information within the past year. And 77 percent of online health seekers start with a search engine—as opposed to going directly to a healthcare provider’s web site or an online review site.

Translation: Healthcare is a consumer industry and the web largely determines the winners and losers. And what comprises a winning website? Informative, entertaining, and insightful content that people want to read, view, share, and comment on.

When it comes to healthcare, the website’s job is to introduce the hospital or practice and its providers, demonstrate their qualifications and compassion, and establish trust—the holy grail in healthcare marketing—all before the doctor actually meets the prospective patient.

Research shows, time and again, that patients want to build relationships with their doctors. Lenz’s independent research has shown that patients care very little about their physicians’ training, board certifications, or leadership positions at the hospital. So, a great CV won’t cut it.

If you’re a physician eager to grow your practice, consider instead a blog retelling the moment you knew you wanted to enter medicine, share your favorite letter from a patient or a photo from your last mission trip, or produce a video that helps family members understand their role in your patients’ care journey. These are great ways to build the trust that your success depends on.

Remember: Content is king in healthcare, too.

 

-Mike Killeen

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Our Favorite Small Business Logos

The right logo can give even the smallest of businesses the biggest brand identities. Here are some of the Lenz team’s favorite small business logo designs.

village-vets-logo

new-vinson-logo

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new-verb-logo

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The Power of the Past: Nostalgia Marketing

Nostalgia Casette

We’ve all experienced the moment when a song on the radio instantly transports you back to the exact place and time you first heard it. Or when the aroma of a food or perfume immediately brings to mind a particular memory from your past.

That feeling is nostalgia, and it’s an undeniably powerful psychological trigger. And if you’re paying attention, you can find it in marketing messages all around you.

BMW chose the nostalgia route for its ad in the 2015 Super Bowl, one of the single most visible marketing platforms in the world. National brands from The Chicago Cubs to Pepsi celebrated October 21, 2015 as Back to the Future day to mark the date when Marty McFly arrives to the “future” in the 1989 blockbuster. Buzzfeed has become one of the web’s most visited content sites due in part to its seemingly never-ending “Remember When” listicles. Throwback Thursday’s photos are a top trending social topic on a weekly basis. The list of nostalgia marketing in action could go on and on.

But why is nostalgia an effective marketing tool? According to this New York Times article, it’s actually a bittersweet feeling associated with longing for meaningful events in the past that involved people we’re close to like friends, family, and significant others. Its effects are inherently positive and emotional, ranging from enhanced moods and reduced stress to positive feelings about the future.

In short, reliving happy memories of the past can help you feel good about the future. If your company’s marketing can make people feel good, they will be more inclined to become brand loyalists and sing your praises to their own friends and families.

But how can you capitalize on the power of nostalgia without your marketing feeling outdated? Here are a few tips: 

1. Make what’s old new again using current platforms.

Even if your content celebrates the past, your delivery mechanisms shouldn’t. Customize your content for each platform, but feel free to forego that MySpace post.

2. Don’t force it.

Does your company have an important anniversary coming up? A re-release of a popular product or service? Look for natural opportunities to be nostalgic, but don’t push it if it’s not really there.

3. Keep current.

This may seem illogical, but one of the best ways to create nostalgia-centric marketing is to monitor what cultural conversations are grabbing headlines, and then use your content to draw comparisons or contradictions to similar events of the past. If, of course, it aligns with your greater brand messaging.

Could your marketing use a dose of nostalgia to help you achieve your goals? Contact us and let’s take a look together.

-Mike Killeen

 

 

 

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Lenz’s SouthCoast Health Commercial Wins Davey Award

Lenz is thrilled to have won a 2015 Silver Davey Award in the Healthcare (non-hospital category) for its 30-second SouthCoast Health “Total Wellness” TV commercial. The Davey Awards is an international creative awards competition focused exclusively on honoring outstanding work from the best small ?rms worldwide.

The 2015 Davey Awards received nearly 4,000 entries from ad agencies, interactive agencies, production ?rms, in-house creative professionals, graphic designers, design ?rms, and public relations ?rms.

The awards honor work whose strength comes from big ideas, out-of-the-box thinking and exceptional execution.

Creative execution for the commercial was developed by SouthCoast Health and Lenz Creative Director Cameron Spivey, in partnership with Gregory Miller Productions, Outback Editorial, and Agency Producer, Laura Dobson.

Haven’t seen the commercial yet? Check it out below.

You Should Know: Dan Kamal

Dan Kamal

You might know Dan Kamal’s voice even if you aren’t a local hockey fan.

If you did happen to be a hockey fan during the Atlanta Thrashers’ run from 1999 to 2011 (or that of the minor-league Atlanta Knights from 1994 to 1996), then Dan’s creative – and at times euphoric — calls on 900 regular season games most certainly are familiar to you and might even have left you with some fond memories.

Since Aug. 29, Dan has hosted The Sports Insider produced by Lenz and presented by PT Solutions on 92.9 The Game, Atlanta’s biggest sports talk station. Each Saturday morning, Dan brings out the best in the show’s guests, providing listeners insights into the latest happenings of local and national interest in the sports world.

“Dan Kamal is a pro’s pro when it comes to radio,” said Lenz CEO Richard Lenz. “We’re thrilled to have him as part of our new venture. With PT Solutions, 92.9 The Game and Dan, we have a great team to make The Sports Insider a huge success.”

Dan said he has tried to build a broadcast career based on energy and an entertaining style. In the case of The Sports Insider, he said his goal is to be thought-provoking, insightful and at times humorous.

“The thing I would probably be the most grateful for in my career is the opportunities I’ve had and the responses I’ve gotten from viewers or fans in general,” Dan said. “I feel like I’ve always worked for them, not so much for me, and the feedback has been very gratifying. I’m hoping to perpetuate that with this opportunity.”

Dan is a radio professional with more than 30 years’ experience who has made metro Atlanta his home for more than 20 years. Along the way, he has worked for WGST as part of its coverage of the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games, PGA Tour Radio, as a studio host for the Atlanta Falcons Radio Network, as a freelance reporter for the CNN Radio Network, as a fill-in anchor for CNN’s Headline Sports and as a studio analyst for Fox Sports Ohio’s television broadcasts.

For the past three-and-a-half years, Dan has taken on a more behind-the-scenes role in the media business. Mondays through Fridays, he works as a freelance writer, producer and editor for CNN and for CNN International’s World Sport. In that role, he has written copy for CNN anchors across virtually all news programming on the network, including for Carol Costello and Wolf Blitzer. It also means he has learned a view of sports that is more global — in every sense of the word.

“I’ve written top stories,” Dan said, “breaking news.”

An Alpharetta resident, Dan is married with two adult children. His wife Dot is a school nurse. His daughter Deanna works for an architectural firm in Nashville and his son Chris, a former Division I hockey player, was recently hired as director of hockey operations and an assistant coach for the University of Alaska-Anchorage, Chris’ alma mater.

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Lenz, in partnership with PT Solutions, announces ‘The Sports Insider’ on 92.9 The Game

Hosted by long-time Atlanta radio voice Dan Kamal and filled with top local and national guests, the show airs Saturdays from 8 to 9 a.m.

Leveraging a unique business model that has proved successful in the past, Lenz has broken into the sportstalk radio business with the help of partners PT Solutions and 92.9 The Game to produce “The Sports Insider.”

“The Sports Insider” is hosted by long-time Atlanta radio voice Dan Kamal, the former play-by-play broadcaster for the NHL’s Atlanta Thrashers, who brings three decades of experience and credibility to the air. Each week, listeners hear from guests such as former University of Georgia star D.J. Shockley and Georgia Tech standout Roddy Jones, along with top local and national writers.

PT Solutions, the presenting sponsor of “The Sports Insider,” has a segment each week in which Dr. Dale Yake provides guidance on a sports medicine issue or injury. PT Solutions, which is headquartered in Kennesaw, is a privately owned physical therapy practice with 65 locations across eight states.

In 2011, Lenz, which specializes in healthcare marketing, established a partnership with 50,000-watt News/Talk WSB and to create “Weekly Check-up,” a medical show that airs on Sundays from 3 to 5 p.m. and has 40,000 weekly listeners. The show is hosted by Dr. Bruce Feinberg, the former CEO of Georgia Cancer Specialists, and presented Georgia Urology.

Having established a successful medical show on one of Atlanta’s biggest news stations, Lenz founder, president and CEO Richard Lenz sought to do the same in partnership with PT Solutions. 92.9 The Game, a 100,000-watt station, is the home of the Atlanta Falcons and Hawks and the most listened to sportstalk station in Atlanta.

In August, Inc. magazine named PT Solutions No. 3,148 on its list of the 5,000 fastest growing companies in the United States. The company has posted a three-year growth rate of 109 percent.

“We were looking for a way to create more brand awareness for PT Solutions and its 17 locations in metro Atlanta,” Lenz said. “I believe that the model we created with WSB, which has proved hugely successful, would also serve PT Solutions perfectly. I think that PT Solutions will reap great benefits from this partnership.”

PT Solutions is a privately owned physical therapy practice with 65 locations across eight states. PT Solutions therapists specialize in advanced clinical treatment that uses the latest research to make their patients unstoppable. PT Solutions’ partners include hospitals and multi-clinic practices. To learn more, visit PTSolutions.com, connect with PT Solutions Physical Therapy on Facebook, and follow @PT_Solutions on Twitter and Instagram.

Based in Decatur, Georgia, Lenz partners with our clients so we can grow together. For more than two decades, Lenz’s specialized expertise has helped our clients reach their goals. We offer the full range of digital and traditional marketing expertise, including brand strategy, advertising, PR, website development, inbound marketing and more.

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How Do You Market Healthcare?

We get this question a lot, and our answer is that you should market healthcare much like you market anything—by telling stories that change or reinforce your audience’s behavior.

Sure, that’s easier said than done. But, remember, patients aren’t just patients. They are fathers, mothers, sons, and daughters—in other words the same people who buy Coca Cola and vote in elections.

For many years, Lenz has practiced the philosophy that healthcare decisions are made much like other buying decisions, and that the best marketing practices should be directed towards prospective patients.

Our clients appeared on billboards, TV ads, and social media networks long before their competitors—because patients (and even doctors) consume and are influenced by media too!

Hopefully, this perspective has positioned us and our clients especially well for the increased consumerism in healthcare that we know today.

So, marketing healthcare is a lot like marketing other products. Some key points related to our philosophy include:

  • Lead with the goal, then develop the strategy; only then consider tactics and execution.
  • Invest in market research; do not assume that what you think you know is correct.
  • Marketing works best when it is fully integrated; each marketing channel and program should be strategically oriented and complement the others.
  • Tell stories.
  • Track, measure, report, and analyze results against the stated goals and objectives.
  • Remember, patients are consumers. They have the information and access they need to make healthcare choices. Your marketing strategy should reflect their individualized needs, wants, and preferences.

If you want to work with Lenz, please let us know. We’ve got a great team that is eager to help quality healthcare businesses reach their goals.

-Richard Lenz

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Is Marketing Healthcare Like Marketing Shoes?

-cindys-slippers

Is marketing healthcare like marketing shoes?

Well, kind of.

Healthcare marketing obviously requires extra sensitivity since the subject is private and deeply personal for most people. And because doctors should never prioritize a healthy business over a healthy patient.

But in many ways, marketing is marketing—whether for medical services or sneakers. Either way, your job is to communicate the value of your product to your audience in order to change or reinforce their behavior.

I’ve spent more than 20 years marketing healthcare organizations, so, yes, I do consider it a specialized field. But, if you’re a doctor, practice manager, or hospital administrator, don’t forget the basics.

Your prospective patients want value. They want to make choices with confidence. And most of all, they want to associate with brands, organizations and products that reinforce their views of themselves.

If the shoe fits, your audience will wear it.

-Richard Lenz